Afghanistan Taliban wants women to obey husbands

Image copyright AFP Image caption The Taliban has decreed that women cannot be educated without a husband’s permission, have no right to choose their husband or get married in Shariah law

Islamic law may favour equality between the sexes but the Taliban’s demands on women to obey their husbands make no mention of education, work or marriage.

The Islamist group has decreed that women cannot be educated without a husband’s permission, have no right to choose their husband or get married in Shariah law.

But in English-language documents it has said women should be equal in work, education and their rights over their bodies.

It has also apparently ruled that women are entitled to a vote but should not question Islamic law.

The Taliban controls 80% of the country.

It has already detained an estimated 36,000 students at one educational institution – for studying the Koran.

Teachers and the people running the school told the BBC that student were apparently not being told about the Taliban’s new edict.

Watch our report of the Taliban’s edict on Afghanistan here

Equal opportunity

The Taliban has also issued a long list of supposedly forbidden activities, which includes allowing Afghan women to take their own trips alone, to keep their identity cards, or to go to markets at all hours.

It says their face coverings and miniskirts are illegal.

The law is similar to previous edicts by the Taliban, saying that women must follow Islamic law.

But it says women should be equally sure that their husbands will obey all of the law or deal harshly with those who do not.

The Taliban said its goal is to “eliminate” Taliban officers and hold those who disobey to account, the Associated Press news agency reported.

It said officials from the group had been in contact with government representatives to discuss ways to implement the edict.

Some sections are ambiguous.

In one section the Taliban’s written edict says Afghan women are “protected” from any form of harm.

But it is specifically forbidden from being given aid by non-Muslims.

It said the announcement was addressed to “all women of Afghanistan, as well as men”.

The head of the opposition party – the Islamic Renaissance Party of Afghanistan – said the Taliban’s edict was “ridiculous”.

Spokesman Sarhad Masood said: “If the Taliban continues to threaten women and violate human rights, they will face the consequences.”

But the interior ministry in Kabul welcomed the edict.

“It is a most important decree from the Taliban, which aims to protect Afghan women,” spokesman Najib Danish said.

“It will put an end to the problem of extremism, which will help Afghan women to have better conditions and to live in peace.”

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