Electric cars are booming in Europe

Written by J, a, cc, st, k, , x, x, y, x, s, o, j, k, i, v, h, g A lack of electric cars has long been an albatross around the necks of…

Electric cars are booming in Europe

Written by J, a, cc, st, k, , x, x, y, x, s, o, j, k, i, v, h, g

A lack of electric cars has long been an albatross around the necks of European automakers, highlighted by their poor performance at the Paris Auto Show this year and ongoing struggles to win design awards from the European car critics.

Whether it’s Elon Musk’s Model S on a racetrack or Toyota’s Supra, electric vehicles are even considered slow — or worse — by the respected Auto Express Magazine.

Fast forward two years to Geneva, and Europe’s automakers have taken the show by storm.

It’s not as if they weren’t going to show off electrified machines: from Chevrolet’s new Bolt EV to Volkswagen’s battery-powered I.D. Crozz, the models have been lined up.

But what’s really turning heads is the number of “usual suspects” that are lapping Europe’s technical congress.

Chugging away

Throughout most of the past century, electric cars were alien concepts and were never in the mainstream of the car industry.

“Automakers were never very interested in electric cars,” said David Gauden, a professor of motorsport engineering at the University of Surrey.

“It was the 1980s and they said, ‘no, no, no, no, no.'”

By the early 1990s, he says, “carmakers wanted to turn electric into conventional vehicles that drive on electricity.”

And that was the beginning of electric cars on a wider scale, thanks to the move away from fossil fuels and into the more frugal alternative.

“Now we have a lot of these mainstream manufacturers that are actually using electric technology in the mainstream — BMW, Mercedes, Tesla — and we are seeing a lot of cars built.”

If electric cars aren’t big enough a trend for you, watch this video and watch ” Electric Cars .” You’ll be at ease.

“I don’t think there is a shift of the metal off our necks,” says Gauden. “The European manufacturers are doing this at their own pace, and they are starting to do it in a more widespread fashion, which makes them more welcome.”

Checking batteries

That, says Gauden, is important. What he calls “minor sustainability issues” haven’t stopped Europe’s carmakers from entering the market with electric models. That happens to be much more than in North America.

“They need to prove that this technology can actually be viable, that it’s economical, they have to have this interest in electric vehicles as an identity for them, because they haven’t been having any advertising in the last ten years,” he says.

It’s also part of what he says is the gradual shift toward sustainability.

“When it is valuable in the eyes of the consumer, then there is recognition of the fact that climate change is a reality and we have to reduce greenhouse gases. We can actually do something, so it’s not in my face and it’s not a slow death.”

That’s what seems to be happening in Switzerland’s Garage de la Maritima , who won the main 2018 award for European car of the year for its AMI EVs — it’s also the company that opened Switzerland’s first electric charging point last year.

Start at home

Its models are most prevalent in Europe and China. In the US, it’s in Brazil.

Its vehicles are most prevalent in Europe and China. In the US, it’s in Brazil.

Amanda Mills — who heads up the company’s US team — says the cost for buyers is very competitive and the range is very good.

“What we were attracted to first and foremost is the lack of the gasoline tax in the US,” she said.

“Those that want one car that fits all their needs is something we saw and feel could be a very strong proposition.”

“We see a lot of interest from people who maybe don’t travel a lot, are retired, and they’ve got children who still have to get to school and work. The family sharing dynamic is a huge demand we’ve seen,” Mills says.

California, in particular, has a reputation for wanting electricity to be clean. Once an EV comes in to town it sits on a charger and it’s fully charged.

Amanda Mills — who heads up the company’s US team — says the cost for buyers is very competitive and the range is very good.

“I think part of our success is also the distribution model,” Mills says. “We have three different distribution centers.

“A lot of our products, batteries, are unique and proprietary. We look at ours that way, and we’re in control

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