That’s it! The CEOs, HR hacks and new hires helping us feel fresh again

Phoning in our weekly tech bento box to “Top Chef” as we brainstormed our favorite CEO moves of the week, we felt like the interns making cranky phone calls the morning after the party—we…

That’s it! The CEOs, HR hacks and new hires helping us feel fresh again

Phoning in our weekly tech bento box to “Top Chef” as we brainstormed our favorite CEO moves of the week, we felt like the interns making cranky phone calls the morning after the party—we didn’t sound half bad.

Executives are remaking their plans for losing good talent. It’s a fairly typical event—unicorns fire off HR hounds to gather your résumé and credit card information—but the companies most impacted this time have a different goal in mind.

Consider this: Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, which employs a 1,000-plus full-time data scientist staff to help track everything from investor sentiment to traffic patterns around its Palo Alto headquarters, is operating on a social benefit plan they’ve pitched to staff.

“Most plans say we’ll help you find a job,” said partner David Postman, “but most of us like to work for ourselves and want to get out of the companies that we work for.”

At New York startup 4C, the motivation is money. Though not offering any additional money, co-founder Adrian Tilley cut his salary in half to $18,000 per year in a bid to attract more part-time workers. “I could get nothing with all the opportunity that’s out there,” he said.

And for many staff at Secret, it’s not in-house maternity leave that’s an incentive to work for me. It’s a nanny that’ll come for free if you work there: the Los Angeles-based start-up started offering extra hours in 2017 and now, says founder and CEO Mike Lazerow, “maybe I’ve encouraged some people to move here because we have the nanny.”

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