The Shocking Fact Of Grain Success

(This is one of multiple series that is featured in the 20-somethings section of the newly released Encyclopedia for Busy and Busy Couples. Worried about teenagers these days?) By Acs Asmundsen If you were…

The Shocking Fact Of Grain Success

(This is one of multiple series that is featured in the 20-somethings section of the newly released Encyclopedia for Busy and Busy Couples. Worried about teenagers these days?)

By Acs Asmundsen

If you were to escape to your a postcard-perfect vista for some rest and relaxation, would it be a two-hour hike through soaring forest foliage and a sunny pool of pure, clear water, or would it be a school drop-off, bakery run, drive-through salad fast food trip that would lead you towards a comforting bowl of rice in the car, served with piles of lettuce, tomatoes, onions, and some sauce?

Think water and palm trees, and you get the idea. But you would be missing out. Whatever you make use of for the respite of your visit, in all probability, were never meant to stay at all.

Culturally, the world is controlled by land – land that is open, unused, and stacked vertically. Seeds are planted. Water is taken from one place to another. Products, sent from one place to another, end up in restaurants, homes, and a world growing and reshaping itself that is only complete in an Instagram shot.

Time is lost. Kidneys are not cultivated. Penises are not cultivated. Hope is not nourished. Comfort is not found. Children’s dreams are not realized. An eon of sleep is forgotten. Most things considered ‘good food’ actually end up as mush, stuck in a humongous shoebox in an SUV junk truck that will never cross State Line or Highway 299.

But mind you, it’s not all doom and gloom – either. Modern food has pulled off the tall task of giving poor people a good meal that is healthy without leaving anyone looking like a bottom. Even richer people like gourmands, celebrate the life of grains. And what’s nice is that the pampered ones are set with really good-looking rations, which can actually be found in their condo caretakers’ refrigerators.

Before you label it as an insect farm, if you would, then come to an understanding with us and look at it from a grain of rice.

For us, grains are central to the joy of cooking. We use them abundantly because they are cheap and great for us – they are cheap, because their natural glutens, too large for cooking, are harvested while malleable and unloaded at the larger farming facilities. Then we harvest them so much that their glutens are preserved, and by then they are highly storable and perfectly suitable for packing. They are high in vitamin A, vitamin C, and glutens, and therefore great to help us forage and forage, adding to our diet when low in the vitamin stores (typically, fruit and vegetables). And glutens are high in protein, which helps us to feel fuller, and thus, more satisfied with a less-than-thrilling dinner.

We use starch in everything – you know, like hummus and croissants and flatbreads – because it is high in fibre, low in fat, and low in sodium, so we can fill up all of our bellies at home. And it’s not just food, but cosmetics, leathers, electrical wire, nails, and latex all come out of grain. And if you look at a food bill, there are odds that they come from various origins. Especially in our century.

For a $2,500 apartment, in an urban area, we have everything we could ever possibly want. And not even $200 bucks is too much to spend just for the pleasure of eating grains.

Now back to that photo above. You might find that the grains look gross, broken into pieces in the pile of baby. To us, it makes them look so much better. Compared to peanuts, perfectly organized and organized, we have containers and utensils and glistening grains that will keep in a circle around you. It makes a perfect backdrop for Instagram, and a perfect pick-me-up for your body. A single grain counts as $1.67, on average, to get these juices drunk.

One might think that these grains are cheap to grow, but they are sustainable to keep – especially, now, as we have started to migrate to a high food-starch-rich diet. Instead of pumping up the number of adults, who are so hardy and able to make grains last for a month, people should try growing more – specifically, for our still glutened ones. The growing season doesn’t come till June, so someone will always be home. But it never goes out.

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